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Abstract Overviews

Mr Glen Alleman

ABSTRACT: PGCS Masterclass

Strategies to Detect, Prevent, and Correct Causes of Project Stress and Failure

Masterclass Overview

As Australia embarks on an unprecedented level of capital expenditure on major projects across multiple domains in Federal and State Governments including Defence and infrastructure across multiple sectors, including roads and rail projects in both the major capital cities and regional areas, it is timely to be reminded that major projects are perilous undertakings with the risks of project stress (defined and cost and/or schedule overrun) and failure both ever present, requiring ongoing monitoring to prevent and correct.

This master class provides a rare opportunity to learn from the latest United States research on the primary causes and contributors to project stress and failure and the latest strategies and tools and techniques which can be implemented to prevent and correct these issues, significantly improving the probability of successful project delivery outcomes.

The foundation of this masterclass is research, principles, and practices developed at the US Institute for Defence Analyses, a Federally Funded Research and Development Centre (FFRDC) which analysed root causes of project and program stress and failure for US Department of Defence programs. While this research informs the policy advice provided to the US Defence Department Office of Performance Assessments and Root Cause Analyses (PARCA) focused at improving the probability of project and program success, the lessons learned can be applied to all projects and programs across government and industry.

Masterclass Objectives:

The attendees will learn the principles and practices needed to identify the primary causes of project stress and failure as shown in the diagram below.

The attendees will gain hands on experience to prepare them with the skills to identify:

Master class attendees will return to work with the knowledge and hands on experience needed to identify and implement preventative and corrective actions to address the primary causes and contributors to project stress and failure increasing the probability of successful delivery outcomes for projects and programs in their domains.

Professor Charles Keating

ABSTRACT: PGCS Masterclass

A Practical Guide to implementing Complex Systems Governance Concepts on Projects

Masterclass Overview

The purpose of this workshop is to provide a hands-on experience for Project Management (PM) professionals for application of Complex System Governance (CSG) concepts. CSG is a new and novel approach to improve performance through purposeful design, execution, and evolution of essential system functions. These functions sustain project performance in the midst of external turbulence and internal flux. CSG addresses the 'messes' and 'wicked problems' that are the by-product of modern projects and continue to overwhelm PM practitioners. Application of CSG for PM is examined to: (1) appreciate and map the complex environment faced by modern PM, (2) discover sources of 'deep system' project failure modes that ultimately produce schedule delays, cost overruns, and missed performance targets, (3) explore the 'systems' basis for those failure modes, and (4) develop responsive and feasible systems-based strategies to preclude failure modes in the design, execution, and development of complex projects.

Masterclass Objectives:

The workshop objectives are:

(1) Examine the nature and implications of the complex problem domain facing PM professionals.

(2) Explore CSG as a systems-based response to better deal with increasingly complex projects.
(3) Apply CSG methods to discover 'deep system' failure modes in design, execution, or development of projects.
(4) Determine feasible strategic responses to preclude or mitigate CSG failure modes in complex projects.

As a result of the workshop, participants will be better prepared and equipped to apply CSG concepts and tools. This will permit identification and assessment of systems-based project failure modes, mitigation of negative consequences, and identification of feasible actions improve project performance through design, execution, or development modifications.

Ms Val Jonas

ABSTRACT: PGCS Masterclass

Leading the way on Risk Intelligent Decision Making (Risk Vision, Framework and Engagement)

Masterclass Overview

As we embark on ever more challenging programmes and complex projects, in a world that can change in the blink of an eye, it's imperative we get better (and faster) at decision making. We no longer have time to gather data and prevaricate before choosing a way forward. We need information at our fingertips and the confidence to take the right path ahead.

Despite our increasing expectations that people be innovative and embrace agile methodologies, we nonetheless fail to provide the structures and skills required to handle the risks (or exploit the opportunities) they will inevitably encounter. Without a mature approach to risk, your decisions will most likely be hasty and ill-thought through - you'll be walking a tightrope.

Of course, one-size-doesn't-fit-all when it comes to risk. It depends on your objectives, the context you're working in, your team capabilities, resource availability and so on. Therefore, you need to know how to put together a sound structure for risk, that supports intelligent decision making based on your specific needs. Having created the structure, you then need to know how to communicate the value of risk in supporting successful outcomes.

Masterclass Objectives:

You will learn how to design practical structures that support sound risk-intelligent decision making. Attendees will work together to gain experience in

The goal is to ensure the whole team is focused on achieving successful outcomes, instead of being bogged down in myopic short-term problems.

You will understand how to communicate the value of risk and know how to embed risk intelligent decision making tools and techniques into your organisation, making your team stronger together and motivated behind common vision and goals.

Mr Oliver Barker

ABSTRACT:

Suppliers – Harmonising the Relationship

Overview

Is it possible to operate as One Team with a Supplier? Where collaborative working is the norm, honesty and transparency exists at all levels, there is a shared ownership of outputs and communication is frequent and regular.

The Astute Class Submarine Programme can be classified as a Mega Project by any conceivable measure and is demonstrably one of the most complex engineering projects within the United Kingdom. The Programme, in delivering a fleet of 7 nuclear-powered attack submarines to the Royal Navy, plays a vital role in the UK's ability to defend itself, economy, culture and general way of life.

During this presentation, set against the backdrop of the Astute Programme, I will provide an overview of the lessons learned in operating a joint project controls model and how these lessons can be applied to a different types of projects, across a range of sectors.
Looking through the Project Controls Lens the presentation will cover:

Ms Loretta Bayliss

ABSTRACT:

The future of project controls in an integrated world, BIM and beyond

Overview

Ms Jo-Anne Harrison, M.Mgmt, FAICD, FGIA, FCIS

ABSTRACT:

The impacts of Cloud computing on Project Management and the construction industry

Overview

The introduction of new technologies has revolutionised numerous industries over several years. Many of which are well placed to leverage these technologies for its advantage, though quite often the set-up costs for this technology were seen as prohibitive and the 'if it isn't broken why fix it' mentality has seen some industries very much falling into the late adopter territory.

In this presentation we will be looking at the current contributions and use cases of Cloud computing in project management practices, mostly by reviewing peer papers on the topic produced over the last ten (10) years. Also, via investigation of companies at the forefront of developing these technologies.

Key in the presentation will be that Cloud computing is an innovation enabler for other emerging technologies including the Internet of Things (IoT), virtual reality, data analytics and building information management (BIM). We will be discussing current and future applications of Cloud computing in the industry while looking at the barriers to future adoption and possible strategies to overcome these.

Ms Mandy Hill

ABSTRACT:

Knowing how and when to apply an Agile approach

Overview

The Digital Trensformation Aagency's Service Standard prescribes an agile approach to project delivery, and the Government is pushing for an iterative and incremental style for the delivery of value. Reconsiling these requirements with the need to plan for the delivery of the outcomes committed to in the business cases can be difficult. Mandy's presentation will outline a road map for navigating the complex decisions needed to balance a fully agile approach with the need to work within prescribed budgets, based on successfully delivering many projects across government

Mr Ciril Karo

ABSTRACT:

The challenges of program management and controls from a GBM perspective

Overview

Professor Ralf Müller, DBA, MBA, PMP

ABSTRACT:

Multi-Level Governance in Inter-Organizational Project Networks

Overview

Inter-organizational project networks are common in major programs involving governments and delivery partners working collaboratively. Management systems are typically designed as hybrid networks including hierarchical and non-hierarchical structures. This challenges traditional governance theories, which typically assume either a hierarchical or a network structure, but not a mix of it. However, for project execution all structural elements of the network need to be governed simultaneously.

Multi-level governance (MLG) theory integrates hierarchical (Type I) and non-hierarchical (Type II) network governance structures into an integrated theory framework. This framework allows applying existing governance theories to their respective parts of the network, and goes further by providing an interface to link and synchronize Type I and Type II governance through three governance entities. The presentation will address the concept of MLG and provide empirical examples of its application to hybrid structures and the three organizational entities which provide the link between Type I and Type II governance in network structures.

Mr Mark Purcell

ABSTRACT:

The Real-World Importance of Effective Project Governance and Controls - A Combined Defence and Defence Industry Perspective

Overview

As a senior Defence executive responsible for the Rizzo Reform program, Head of Navy Engineering and Head Maritime Systems Division, now retired Rear Admiral Mark Purcell RAN was the end user recipient of the project governance and controls reports and information reported to him from which very important decisions "of real-world consequence" to significant projects and programs were made.

Since retiring from the Royal Australian Navy, Mark has now had the opportunity to examine project governance and control systems from the Defence industry perspective.

Mark Purcell is very well placed to provide useful insights on what senior decision makers consider to be useful information from project governance and control systems, how that information is used to assist informed decision making and the consequences which can occur when useful project governance and controls information is not available to decision makers.

Mark has the rare capacity to be able to reflect on what is working well from an integrated Defence, and Defence industry perspective, what might be improved, as well as considering the impacts and benefits of the additional governance and controls requirements which have occurred post First Principles Review.

Mr Andrew Butt

ABSTRACT:

CASG – Maritime Ships: Confidence Level Analysis

Overview

Mr Chris Carson, FRICS, FAACE, FGPC PSP, CEP, DRMP, CCM, PMP

ABSTRACT:

The Path from Good Project Scheduling to Implementing Advanced Work Packaging

Overview

Embracing Advanced Work Packaging (AWP) has been proven to improve field productivity, reduce installed cost, increase schedule performance, and increase predictability, however, fully integrating AWP can be difficult and expensive, and requires a contractual arrangement to fully embrace the changes necessary. But adapting to AWP can best be done in steps starting with schedule development and making the move to an AWP-oriented baseline schedule will provide a good return on the time investment. The structured process described in this session enables a good scheduler to lead the project team to develop the schedule ready to move into the next step of the process of implementing formal AWP.

AWP is a collaborative approach to project delivery, that aligns engineering, procurement, and construction; with a focuses on early planning This presentation will offer an overview of Advanced Work Planning and Advanced Work Packaging (AWP) and how these concepts can be used to improve the basline CPM schedule.

Mr Darrall Thompson and Mr Danny Carroll

ABSTRACT:

Integrating capability development and skills tracking

Overview

Dr Jan Drienko

ABSTRACT:

Operational issues in workforce management and their fit within the broader strategies in light of new challenges in internal and external labour markets

Overview

We are entering a time of continuous change. Some changes are incremental to keep up with changes in work and the way work is delivered and some are more fundamental where work structures need to be transformed. Both create change for which we have to prepare in terms of the workforce but also in terms of organisational structures. The road towards more flexible ways of working is a complex one with many limitations, much resistance and all new processes. These conditions present tremendous opportunities to create a new evolution in our workforce to form a more future focused customised approaches to workforce management and support delivery of program outcomes.

Workforce management is currently focused on fulfilling specific requirements of delivering on projects and programs with the challenge of limited availability of highly specialised workforce and continually changing schedules. Under the future strategy of Plan, Govern and Assure in conjunction with goals of Australian Industry Capability (AIC) in addressing current and future program needs, a more rigorous approach is needed to develop plans to shape the current workforce, skills and specialisations to effectively meet future challenges.

We have designed and built an approach not only targeted at investigating impacts of policy changes (including current and future impacts of COVID), evaluating regional labour markets and their limitations, internal workforce structures and designing transition plans to address functional changes but also testing various models of engaging Australian industry and internal communications to support workers through future changes as well as implementing innovative approaches impacting social behaviours and improving workforce motivation.

We will uncover some of the most pressing operational issues in workforce management and their fit within the broader strategies in light of new challenges in internal and external labour markets.

Ms Meri Duncanson

ABSTRACT:

Lets re-examine how Agile is EVM

Overview

Earned Value Management is a structured approach that provides the ability to forecast the future performance on a project, based on the past performance - using a systematic disciplined approach to integrate scope, schedule and costs into a measurable baseline.

Agile is an iterative approach to project management that helps teams deliver value to the customer faster and with fewer headaches. Agile teams deliver work in small increments so that project requirements, plans and results are evaluated continuously and the teams can respond to change quickly, rather than a 'big bang' delivery.

This presentation is an interactive re-examination on how Agile and EVM can work together to uplift project performance and boost project analysis and forecasting. Giving an overview of both Earned Value Management and Agile methodology and using real world examples and scenarios, showing how the two approaches to managing projects can be melded into an effective framework focused on delivering quality outcomes for both the customer and the business.

Mr Andrew Goodwin

ABSTRACT:

AS4817-2019, ISO EVM Implementation Guide project

Overview

LC Victoria Jnitova and GPCAPT Adrian Xavier

ABSTRACT:

Measuring RAAF Training System Resilience using Survey Instrument

Overview

The presenters conducted a case study to measure RAAF training systems' resilience in a selected RAAF unit using a survey tool. The survey is based on the original resilience framework and is supported by the automated reporting functionality.
This presentation, we will introduce our original resilience framework, and how the Survey has been developed using this framework. The survey conduct, validation and results will also be discussed. We will conclude our presentation by outlining the study relevance and benefit to Defence, as well as proposing directions for future research. This approach is being trialled by the RAN and Army, however, there is nothing uniquely military in the approach, other departments or corporations with internal training organisations will benefit substantially from adopting similar systems.

Dr Yongjian Ke

ABSTRACT:

Social Media Use in Project Management – An Exploratory Study of Multiple Transport Projects

Overview

The research aims to explore the opportunities that social media could offer to project managers at different stages of transport projects. Multiple case studies is the research method. We chose to study CBD and South East Light Rail project and Sydney Metro Northwest project in Sydney, Australia and Chennai Metro Phase-1 in Chennai, India. We used Python and Twitter Search API to retrieve social media data on Twitter. A round of interviews is currently being conducted to understand how social media was used in the project management of those chosen projects.

The presentation will focus on how social media could provide an opportunity to evaluate benefits and public values qualitatively. In particular, two questions will be addressed: How will social media data help us to take into account and monitor public value creation and benefits realisations in infrastructure projects? And what are the barriers and opportunities for using social media data in project management? A following research plan and expected results will also be discussed.

Mr Walt Lipkie

ABSTRACT:

Earned Schedule – application of the To Complete Schedule Performance Index

Overview

A few years ago, a theoretical study was made of the To Complete Performance Index (TCPI) of Earned Value Management. The study concluded that when the TCPI value of 1.10 is exceeded the project is out of control and recovery is very unlikely. Recent analysis using real data has shown that the value 1.10 for TCPI and the To Complete Schedule Performance Index (TSPI) from Earned Schedule is a definitive and reliable performance threshold. This presentation describes the use of Earned Value Management/Earned Schedule project performance measures with the established threshold to compute the probability of cost and schedule recovery. Utilizing the computed probability, a schedule performance improvement strategy is discussed for achieving project recovery. The application of the recovery probability and strategy enhances the likelihood for having a successful project.

Mr Sandeep Mathur

ABSTRACT:

Using Data Science Initiatives to deliver Smart Infrastructure and improve Customer Experience - A Transport for NSW Case Study

Overview

Transport NSW is currently delivering a $57.5billion investment in infrastructure and every investment has a large technology component. It is leveraging new technologies and data analytics to transition to transport of the future, and accelerate the benefits across passenger transport and freight networks. Data is increasingly ubiquitous in organizational life and Data Science Initiatives (DSIs) have emerged as a popular mechanism for extracting value from it. Artificial intelligence, machine learning and big data technologies are changing the face of the transport sector. They're driving greater efficiency, increasing productivity, and tracking benefits realisation. Customers have more options to personalise their journeys, and use real-time data to make informed decisions about when and how to travel. Customers have more connected and seamless end-to-end journeys, with more options for how they plan, book and pay for travel. This is underpinned by intelligent systems that use rich real-time data from smart sensors.

This presentation covers some use cases of how Transport for NSW is using data and Data Science Initiatives (DSIs) to deliver smart infrastructure and improve customer. It also covers how data is enabling better investment decisions specifically in Active Transport area to promote Walking & Cycling.

Dr Anh Pham-Waddell

ABSTRACT:

Force Structure Plan 2020 Costing Methodology andOutcomes

Overview

FSP20 has implemented a transformative process in costingthat involves using a consistent methodology and costing tool that provides comprehensive cost assurance. The new parametric methodology for cost estimation and assurance aligns with First Principles Review that Defence needs to have cost estimation that factors in both acquisition and sustainment. This
methodology has the outcome of improved accuracy and completeness for total cost of ownership. In continuing the best practices of FSP20 it has significant strategic importance to Defence and its project portfolio.

Mr Pat Weaver

ABSTRACT:

The origins of Earned Value Management

Overview

The concept of using performance data to empirically predict project completion seems to be a remarkably recent innovation. Contracts with completion and cost deadlines can be traced back to the Roman Empire if not before (and for Roman contractors the term 'deadline' had a more explicit meaning that today), and measuring performance and paying for work accomplished was standard for cottage industry 'piecework' from the 15th century on. But while the function of measuring and paying for work done was standard, and contracts required delivery 'on-time' there does not seem to be any process for formalised planning and control until the 20th century.

Henry L Gantt used the number of rivets fixed to assess the percentage of a ship's structure complete during WW1, the total number of rivets were known from the design, the number fixed from the piecework pay records. The percentage calculated was a good approximation for the overall performance of the work. He used a similar concept in his Gantt Chart in the 1920s to compare actual to planned. Bur nowhere does this information get used to predict the likely completion. In parallel accountants could compare actual costs with budget, but lacked any process for estimating the final cost to complete. The use of formula to predict outcomes seems to be a development of the 1960s.

This presentation will trace the development of EVM from the foundations outlined above, through to ISO 21508, and then look at the still unanswered challenges of predicting time and cost outcomes accurately.

Roksana Jahan Tumpa

ABSTRACT:

Developing Employability Attributes of Higher Education Project Management Graduates: A Scoping Review

Overview

Projects play a pivotal role in modern enterprises. Functional structures of organisations are being replaced by project-based organisations. Along with the growth in project management, the need for skilled project professionals is mounting for the successful execution of the projects. This reflects the importance of preparing project management graduates for complex project environments. Higher education institutions (HEIs) are responsible for preparing work-ready project management graduates so are responding by continually reviewing and developing effective project management courses. This scoping review focuses on how HEIs are addressing the employers' demand by preparing project management graduates for the industry.

Recent research on work-readiness of project management graduates adds valuable contribution to the literature, however, there is a lack of a rounded overview which focuses on how higher education institutions contribute to the development of employability attributes of project management graduates . Accordingly, this scoping review paper aims to explore the status quo of research on the employability of graduates within the context of project management education. More specifically, the study will capture and investigate the different approaches adopted by of higher education institutions in developing job-ready project management graduates. The paper contributes to the literature by providing insights into project management graduates' job-readiness in order to inform higher education institutions, policymakers and future research.

Li Guan

ABSTRACT:

Modeling Risk Interdependencies to Support Decision Making in Project Risk Management: Analytical and Simulation-based Methods

Overview

Project risks are mostly considered to be independent, ignoring the interdependencies among them, which can lead to inappropriate risk assessment and reduced efficacy in risk treatment. The purpose of this research is to investigate how cause-effect relationships among project risks influence risk assessment results and to develop comprehensive network-based risk indicators which allow project managers to identify critical risks and risk interdependencies more effectively. This study establishes three analytical methods-based project risk assessment models, namely, a Fuzzy Bayesian Belief Network-based risk assessment model, an Interpretive Structural Modeling-MICMAC analysis-based risk assessment model, and a Social Network Analysis-based risk assessment model. In addition, one simulation-based project risk assessment model, i.e., the Monte Carlo Simulation-based risk interdependency network model, is developed to capture the stochastic behavior of project risk occurrence. Case studies are provided to illustrate the application of the proposed risk assessment models. The research findings highlight the importance of considering risk interdependencies in project risk assessment and verify the performance of the proposed models in practical use.

Munir Ahmad Saeed

ABSTRACT:

The Role of Benefits Owner in Effective Benefits Management

Overview

In the Project Management (PM) literature debates on Benefits Management (BM), the benefits owner has emerged as one of the key roles (Patanakul et al. 2016, Zwikael et al. 2019). However, there is still a visible lack of clarity in the PM literature and practice, as to who should be the benefits owner and what are the responsibilities of this role. The findings of a doctoral research on the applicability of BM in the Australian Public Sector organizations (PSOs), identified that the lack of clarity around benefits ownership and the benefits owner's role is seriously inhibiting benefits management in the case study organizations. This study also found that the poor benefits ownership is also directly linked to ineffective project/program governance, as the benefits owner plays important role as the Senior Responsible Officer (SRO) in project assurance and gate reviews. This paper would look at the role of the benefits owner in the PM literature, PM methodologies, impressions and observations of the PM practitioners in the PSOs and how this role can enhance benefits realization in the public sector.

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